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It's out there you know....The adventure you have been looking for. Maybe it's something family friendly, like horseback riding on an exclusive resort only accessible by one of our catamarans or a day relaxing on our large trampolines aboard. But what if you could try out some of the best dive waters in the world?

Discover the dive trip of a life time:
Looking for the ultimate dive? Check out our exclusive crewed catamarans that may offer dive instructors onboard, dive equipment, compressors or more...amazing vacations tailor made by you!

Explore the secrets that lie below the surface:


Some have called the British Virgin Islands one of the world's Top Five Dive Destinations. Others have named it the Top Shipwreck Diving Spot on the planet. With an endless collection of wrecks and rocks to explore, you'll quickly find out why the BVI is one of the best kept secrets in the diving community.

Dive Sites:


The Wreck of the Rhone is the first and only Marine National Park in The British Virgin Islands. It is the most celebrated dive site in the BVI, and a major recreational attraction. The park includes examples of fringing reef habitat and sea grass beds. The wreck is that of a Royal Mail Steamer which sunk during the hurricane of 1867 with 125 persons on board. At 310 feet long and 40 feet wide, the wreck of the Royal Mail Steamer lies in two main parts in waters between 30 and 90 feet deep. Much of it is still intact and visible, including decking, parts of the rigging, the steam engine, and propeller. The Marine Park stretches from Lee Bay on Salt Island westward to include Dead Chest Island. The ship's anchor broke away outside Great Harbor, Peter Island, and this site forms the second portion of the park. The park is used by several commercial dive operators daily. Other dive sites in the park include Rhone Reef, Blonde Rock, and Painted Walls. Anchoring is strictly prohibited in the area in and around the Rhone. The National Parks Trust has installed mooring buoys for use by all commercial, charter and private vessels. If moorings are unavailable around the Rhone, vessels are required to use the Salt Island Settlement or Peter Island anchorages

Alice's Wonderland
Island: Ginger Island

Alice's Wonderland is a colorful coral garden with large coral heads of pillar and star coral with waving purple and green sea fans and soft gorgonians. All five types of butterfly fish can be found including the shy long snout butterfly fish. Large grouper rays, jewfish, african pompano and even reef sharks are also found here on occasion. Surface chop and surge are common.

Depth Range: 40 to 80 feet

Angelfish Reef
Island: Norman Island

This mixture of reef and sand with ridges creates narrow box canyons where an abundance of fish including yellow head jaw fish in sand, sail fin blennies, angel fish and sea horses hiding in the gorgonia can be found. Rays can also be seen and the occasional turtle. High hats, jack-knifes and spotted drums can be seen together. Large swells and currents.


Depth Range: 10 to 90 feet

Black Forest
Island:Peter Island

This is a mini reef wall with many nooks and crannies. Look for a variety of fish such as the shy long snout butterfly fish. Schools of creole wrasse and blue tangs. Hard and soft corals including the endangered black coral are found, hence the name Black Forest. Southern rays can be found in the sand at the bottom of the reef. Usually calm.

Depth Range: 30 to 70 feet

Blonde Rock
Island:Dead Chest

Located between Deadchest and Salt Island, this rock pinnacle is covered on top with yellow fire coral. There is a multitude of ledges and undercuts where much can be found. Schools of jacks and french grunts, scrawled filefish barracuda, cobia and the occasional shark feed in this area. Occasional current and wind chop on surface.

Depth Range: 10 to 65 feet

Blue Chromis Reef
Island:Cooper Island

The topography is sand and coral with sea fans and gorgonian. Spotted drums, quillfin blennies along with blue chromis can all be seen. Take time to look inside the nooks and crannies for spiral anemones and petersen cleaning shrimp. Occasional swells. Usually calm.


Depth Range: 30 to 90 feet

Brewers Bay East
Island:Tortola

Comprised of sand and coral, rays and nurse sharks can be found, as well as tarpon feeding on schools of fry. Current, surges in winter.




Depth Range: 25 to 90 feet

Brewers Bay Pinnacles
Island:Tortola

Pinnacles of varying size and height rise from the ocean the floor. Large jacks, tarpon, eagle rays and turtles. In spring, the humpback whales can be heard singing as they pass through the islands.

Depth Range: 25 to 110 feet

Brewers Bay West
Island:Tortola

Granite rocks form alleys for small fish such as juveniles spotted drums, red lip blennies, and lobsters. Current/surges in winter.


Depth Range:25 to 60 feet

Bronco Billy's
Island:George Dog

Bronco Billy's consists of a number of coral ridges that form canyons and archways covered in colorful hard and soft corals and sponges. Large pillar corals, cup corals and sponges also cover boulders where golden tail, spotted and green moray eels hide. Spotted drums, dog snapper and grunts. Occasional current and surge.

Depth Range: 15 to 50 feet

Brow boxn Pants
Island:Norman Island

This network of ridges form rocky canyons, with an open cave in one. Barracuda, turtles and rays can be seen here along with queen angels, white spotted file fish. Large swells and currents can restrict.



Depth Range:10 to 40 feet

Carrot Shoal
Island:Peter Island

A two-hundred foot ridge rises from 60 feet with nooks and crannies for fish and nurse sharks to hide in. Shy long snout butterfly fish, lobsters, and moray eels can be seen. Occasional current, surface chop if windy.






Depth Range: 11 to 60 feet

Carvel Rock
Island:Cooper Island

This site sits between Cooper and Ginger Islands and is made up of huge boulders. Green morays and lobster hide in the nooks and crannies, whilst redlip blennies sit on top of rocks covered with fire coral and sponges. Barracuda and kingfish can be seen in the blue water, while white spotted file fish, queen trigger fish and durgeon flit among the rocks. Strong currents and large swells often restrict diving.

Depth Range:15 to 90 feet

Cistern Point
Island:Cooper Island

Cistern Point provides a good shallow dive through rocks with craters. On top of the ridge you can find anemones with petersen cleaning shrimp, blue tangs, sergeant majors, jacks and grunts. Tarpon also prey on the fry in spring. Occasional surge.




Depth Range: 10 to 40 feet

Coral Gardens (Aeroplane Wreck)
Island:Great Dog

This good quiet dive site has a mix of sand and beautiful coral formations. The remains of a Shorts 360 aeroplane was moved to this site in 1993 as part of The BVI's artificial reef program. Goat fish, sand divers and southern rays can be seen in the sand. Schools of sennet, grunts and snapper, the occasional blacktip shark, turtles and flying gurnards are also found at this site. Usually calm.

Depth Range:20 to 50 feet

Devil's Kitchen
Island:Cooper Island

Rocky ledges covered with soft and hard corals, with colorful sponges provides a good habitat for parrot fish, schooling grunts, lobsters, the very shy cherub fish and with patience many juvenile fish can be seen. Large swells often limit diving.



Depth Range: 30 to 50 feet

Blonde Rock
Island:Dead Chest

Located between Deadchest and Salt Island, this rock pinnacle is covered on top with yellow fire coral. There is a multitude of ledges and undercuts where much can be found. Schools of jacks and french grunts, scrawled filefish barracuda, cobia and the occasional shark feed in this area. Occasional current and wind chop on surface.

Depth Range:10 to 65 feet

Blue Chromis Reef
Island:Cooper Island

The topography is sand and coral with sea fans and gorgonian. Spotted drums, quillfin blennies along with blue chromis can all be seen. Take time to look inside the nooks and crannies for spiral anemones and petersen cleaning shrimp. Occasional swells. Usually calm.

Depth Range: 30 to 90 feet

Brewers Bay East
Island:Tortola

Comprised of sand and coral, rays and nurse sharks can be found, as well as tarpon feeding on schools of fry. Current, surges in winter.



Depth Range:25 to 90 feet

Dry Rocks East
Island:Cooper Island

This open water site has good visibility and large pelagics, large jacks, and permit can be seen, as well as atlantic spadefish, french angel fish, parrot fish, puffer fish and trunkfish. Occasional large swells and strong currents.






Depth Range: 25 to 85 feet

Fallen Jerusalem National Park
Island:Fallen Jerusalem

The island of Fallen Jerusalem was declared a National Park in 1974. Secluded beaches border delightful snorkeling areas; North Lee Bay beach being the best on the island. On the northwest shore, underwater tunnels and caves are a haven for nocturnal fish, while schools of glassy sweepers glisten like bits of shiny copper. Overnighting is not encouraged, as there is no safe, overnight anchorage.



Ginger Steps
Island:Ginger Island

This site comprised of ledges "stepping" down to 100 ft. Generally the visibility is good and the sun reflects from the white sand between the drop offs giving amazing color to the scene. Juvenile angel fish, fairy basslets and damsel fish play amongst the coral heads. Snappers, squirrel fish, and grunts are also seen around the sponges and sea fans. Occasional strong currents and large swells.


Depth Range: 35 to 100 feet

Grand Central
Island:Guana Island

This site was discovered by Duncan Muirhead of Cuan Law. The site is not often dived due to its location and sea conditions. A broad tunnel is entered at 55 feet and climbs, turns and descends again as it cuts through a point of the island. Occasional heavy swell and current.




Depth Range:40 to 60 feet

Inganess Bay
Island:Cooper Island

This wreck was sunk in the channel between Cooper and Ginger Islands in 1996. The wreck is intact and you can swim into the wheel house as well as the cargo hold. Although relatively new it is already encrusted with corals and there are fish around the wreck. Occasional currents.


Depth Range: 35 to 100 feet

Grand Central
Island:Guana Island

This site was discovered by Duncan Muirhead of Cuan Law. The site is not often dived due to its location and sea conditions. A broad tunnel is entered at 55 feet and climbs, turns and descends again as it cuts through a point of the island. Occasional heavy swell and current.


Depth Range:61 to 90 feet

Joe's Cave
Island:West Dog

This deep cave, which extends above the surface, has schools of glassy sweepers. The walls are covered with soft and hard corals and sponges. Slight current.







Depth Range: 20 to 30 feet

Marie L, Pat, and Beata
Island:Cooper Island

This triple wreck site consists of the Marie L, a cargo boat intentionally sunk in the early 1990s, the Pat, a tugboat sunk a few years later that now lies up against the Marie L, and the Beata, sunk in 2001. Many fish use the wrecks for shelter including large barracuda and moray eels. Southern rays often hide in the sand and reef sharks have been seen. Usually calm.


Depth Range:60 to 90 feet

Painted Walls
Island:Tortola

Considered to be one of the top ten dive sites in the BVI, Painted Walls is located near Dead Chest and features a series of bright-colored gullies and canyons. Turtles and nurse sharks commonly found here.



Depth Range: 30 to 60 feet

Rainbow Canyons
Island:Pelican Island

This colorful dive with corals, sea fans, and sponges of all sizes also has juvenile trunkfish, Creole wrasse, queen angel fish, and juvenile spotted drums hiding in nooks. Sheltered water. Photography, night dive.


Depth Range:20 to 90 feet

Rhone Anchor
Island:Peter Island

Columns and clumps of hard corals typify this site, with a sandy bottom. The coral encrusted Rhone Anchor can be found lying in the sand with the chain still attached. Small blennies, damsel fish, sargent majors wrasse can all be found, along with both queen conch and helmet conch. Usually calm.

Depth Range: 30 to 60 feet

Rhone Reef
Island:Salt Island

Rock canyons and gulleys are the topography of this dive site situated close to the Wreck of the Rhone. A variety of hard and soft corals encourage many fish, turtles, nurse sharks and the occasional reef shark. Occasional current.


Depth Range:40 to 70 feet

Rhone Anchor
Island:Peter Island

Columns and clumps of hard corals typify this site, with a sandy bottom. The coral encrusted Rhone Anchor can be found lying in the sand with the chain still attached. Small blennies, damsel fish, sargent majors wrasse can all be found, along with both queen conch and helmet conch. Usually calm.

Depth Range: 30 to 60 feet

Rhone Reef
Island:Salt Island

Rock canyons and gulleys are the topography of this dive site situated close to the Wreck of the Rhone. A variety of hard and soft corals encourage many fish, turtles, nurse sharks and the occasional reef shark. Occasional current.


Depth Range:40 to 70 feet

Ringdove Rock
Island:Norman Island

Coral heads form a fertile mound, which divers can spiral up and around. Sargent majors are abundant as are lobsters, moray eels and butterfly fish. Occasional current.





Depth Range: 15 to 70 feet

Round Rock
Island:Tortola

This site is comprised of large boulders covered in hard and soft corals, sponges, and gorgonian. The site is not often dived due to the currents, but if conditions are good you can see bar jacks, brow boxn chromis and Creole wrasse. Often current.


Depth Range:40 to 80 feet

Santa Monica Rock
Island:Norman Island

This large underwater pinnacle usually has excellent visibility. The top is covered with fire coral and has many nooks and crannies where moray eels and small fish can hide. Pelagics, atlantic spadefish, barracuda, horse-eye jacks, kingfish and turtles can all be seen. Large swells and currents.


Depth Range: 20 to 70 feet

Sea Dog
Island:West Sea Dog

Large boulders covered in hard and soft corals create many ledges, canyons, and swim throughs. Set in the Atlantic side of the islands, many pelagics are to be found including eagle rays, king fish, mackeral, and the occasional shark. Occasional current and heavy swells.


Depth Range:20 to 80 feet

Shark Point
Island:Peter Island

This site is in open ocean so the visibility can be exceptional. Soft corals cover the reef and ridges. There is a maze of alleys and caves to be explored. Schools of pelagics together with french, white and blue stripe grunts can all be found. Occasional strong current.




Depth Range: 25 to 80 feet

Spyglass Wall
Island:Norman Island

Spyglass Wall is a mini wall that drops to a sandy bottom. With loads of seafans and large coral heads, small fish such as damsel fish, wrasse, fairy basslets can be seen. Look out for tarpon and eagle rays in the blue water and southern stingrays in the sand foraging for food. Occasional swells.


Depth Range:10 to 60 feet

The Caves
Island:Norman Island

A favorite for snorkeling, this site has four caves whose walls are covered with sponges. Schools of fry, yellow tail snappers, and sargeant majors can be seen. Occasional surge. Snorkeling.













Depth Range: 4 to 40 feet

The Chikuzen
Island:Virgin Gorda

Considered to be one of the best dives in the BVI, due to its remote location, this site should only be attempted with experienced dive instructors. The Chikuzen, a 246-foot refrigeration vessel originally built in Japan, was part of the fishing fleet in St Maarten. Situated 12 miles NE of Virgin Gorda surrounded by miles of sand, this is the only place for marine life to congregate. Regular visitors include schooling barracuda, horse-eye jacks and snappers, stingrays, eagle rays, African pompano, atlantic spadefish, nurse sharks, and blacktip reef sharks, along with a resident 600 lb. jewfish. This is a challenging site due to regular swells in the three to five foot range, please check for current conditions.


Depth Range:40 to 75 feet

The Chimney
Island:Great Dog

Named after a rock climbing site due to two boulders forming a narrow box slot. This slot has a lot of colour from sponges and is home to small shrimp, spotted rock lobster, and many anemones. There are ridges and dips with yellow tail damsels, sergeant majors, parrot fish and the occasional scorpion fish. Usually calm.


Depth Range: 15 to 45 feet

The Fearless
Island:Ginger Island

This 100 ft. wreck is home to many schooling fish such as French grunts, bar soldier fish, and Creole wrasse. Southern rays and the occasional eagle ray or turtle can all be seen. Be sure to look in all the nooks and crannies for smaller fish such as fairy basslets, blennies and gobies. Usually calm.


Depth Range:40 to 80 feet

The Indians
Island:Round Rock

Comprised of jagged pinnacles that rise out of the sea with caves and swim throughs, a variety of corals and fish such as angel fish, blue chromis, rock beauties, black durgeons can all be seen. Lettuce leaf slugs and colourful flatworms are also found here. Photography, night dive.


Depth Range: 15 to 90 feet

The Playground
Island:Green Cay

Comprised of large rocks and coral heads in deepwater, often pelagics can be seen including manta rays, reef and nurse sharks, eagle rays and tarpon. Watch for parrot fish and the small red lip blenny. Occasional current and heavy swell.


Depth Range:30 to 90 feet

The Visibles
Island:Geprge Dog

A large pinnacle rises a few feet from the surface. Large gorgonians and sea fans are plentiful. Fish life is in abundance including barracuda, angel fish, snappers, high hats, cherub fish, spotted drums, turtles, tarpon, eagle rays, and both nurse and reef sharks. Occasional current and surge.



Depth Range: 10 to 80 feet

Thumb Rock (Red Bluff Point)
Island:Cooper Island

Named because of the pinnacle underwater that sticks up like a thumb. There is a similar rock above water. The topography is coral encrusted rocks with reef. Tarpon are frequently seen around the pinnacle as well as barracuda. Queen angel and french angel fish chase through the coral while spotted drums and damsel fish hide in the rocks. Occasional large swells and currents. Photography.

Depth Range:20 to 60 feet

Time Square
Island:Guana Island

This rarely dived site, except by Cuan Law, is comprised of two caves that angle up from approximately 30 feet to 7 feet. The caves are deep enough to need a dive torch and one is home to a school of silversides. Nurse sharks have been seen. Occasional heavy swell and current.


Depth Range: 40 to 50 feet

Twin Towers
Island:Little Jose Van Dyke

Two large rock formations rise from 90 feet with smaller rock formations. Eagle Rays and Tarpon are often found here, as well as some interesting fish hide in the rocks between the two pillars. Occasional current and heavy swell.


Depth Range:40 to 90 feet

Twin Towers
Island:Great Tobago

Large rocks are covered with both hard and soft corals. Depth needs to be monitored as the site slopes away to 135 feet. Pelagics are often seen out in the deep water. Red lip blennies are found perched on the rocks. Schools of french and blue stripe grunts are frequent visitors. The endangered black coral can also be found in deeper water. Occasional swell.


Depth Range: 30 to 135 feet

Vanishing Rock (Dry Rocks East)
Island:Cooper Island

This reef is home to "Sargeant Major City" a large multi-spired formation of pillar coral full of fish life. Ledges allow nurse sharks to hide along with lobsters. In the abundance of sponges, soft corals and sea fans you will find reef butterfly fish, trumpet fish and spanish hog fish. Occasional strong current.


Depth Range:24 to 40 feet

Wall to Wall
Island:West Dog

Coral and rock recesses rise from a sandy bottom, fish life is abundant in the form of porkfish, blue striped grunts, big eyes, squirrel fish and angel fish. Octopus, as well as nurse sharks might be found sleeping in a crevice. Usually calm.

Depth Range: 5 to 65 feet

Watson Rock
Island:Great Tobago

Ledges and nooks and crannies typify this dive site. Lobster and the occasional octopus or nurse shark can be found. Lots of smaller fish like the damsel fish, blennies and gobies can all be seen including the shy long snout butterfly fish. Occasional swell.

Depth Range:30 to 50 feet

Wreck of the Parmatta
Island:Anegenda

Off Anegada, the wreck of the Parmatta, which ran aground in 1853 on her maiden voyage, offers an opportunity to see butterfly fish, turtles and huge groupers

























Depth Range:

Wreck of the Rhone - Rhone Marine Park
Island:Salt Island

The Wreck of the Rhone is the first and only Marine National Park in The British Virgin Islands. It is the most celebrated dive site in the BVI, and a major recreational attraction. The park includes examples of fringing reef habitat and sea grass beds. The wreck is that of a Royal Mail Steamer which sunk during the hurricane of 1867 with 125 persons on board. At 310 feet long and 40 feet wide, the wreck of the Royal Mail Steamer lies in two main parts in waters between 30 and 90 feet deep. Much of it is still intact and visible, including decking, parts of the rigging, the steam engine, and propeller. The Marine Park stretches from Lee Bay on Salt Island westward to include Dead Chest Island. The ship's anchor broke away outside Great Harbour, Peter Island, and this site forms the second portion of the Park. The park is used by several commercial dive operators daily. Other dive sites in the park include Rhone Reef, Blonde Rock, and Painted Walls. Anchoring is strictly prohibited in the area in and around the Rhone. The National Parks Trust has installed mooring buoys for use by all commercial, charter and private vessels. If moorings are unavailable around the Rhone, vessels are required to use the Salt Island Settlement or Peter Island anchorages.

Depth Range:30 to 90 feet

Three-day Diving Itinerary

There are many great tour operators, guides and dive shops in the BVI. With over sixty dive sites in the BVI, no matter what your level of expertise, you can plan the diving vacation of your dreams. Here are suggestions for things you don't want to miss when diving in the BVI

And of course, check with your guide to make sure your skill levels are a match for the site

Day One

Head out to Norman Island and make Angelfish Reef your first stop.
This mixture of reef and sand creates narrow box canyons where an abundance of fish including yellow head jaw fish, sailfin blennies, angelfish and sea horses can be found. Rays and the occasional turtle can also be spotted.

Also off Norman Island, try Brow boxn Pants. There are rocky underwater canyons, with an open cave in one. Barracuda, turtles and rays can be seen here, along with queen angels and white spotted tilefish

The Black Forest, a mini reef wall off Peter Island, is named for the endangered black coral found there, and a variety of fish including the long snout butterfly fish, creole wrasses and blue tangs.

Carvel Rock is your last site of Day One. It's off Cooper Island and it's made up of huge boulders. Green morays and lobster hide in the nooks and crannies, while redlip blennies sit on top of rocks covered with fire coral and sponges. Barracuda and kingfish can be seen in the blue water, while white spotted file fish, queen trigger fish and durgeon flit among the rocks. (Strong currents and large swells often restrict diving, so check with your guide.)

Day Two

The Wreck of the Rhone is the "Big Cahuna" of diving sites in the BVI. The wreck is a Royal Mail Steamer, which sunk during the hurricane of 1867 with 125 persons on board. At 310 feet long and 40 feet wide, the wreck of the RMS Rhone lies in two main parts in waters between 30 and 90 feet deep. Much of it is still intact and visible, including decking, parts of the rigging, the steam engine, and propeller.

The Marine Park stretches from Lee Bay on Salt Island westward to include Dead Chest Island. The ship's anchor broke away outside Great Harbour, Peter Island, and this site forms the second portion of the Park. The park is used by several commercial dive operators daily. Other dive sites in the park include Rhone Reef, Blonde Rock, and Painted Walls.

Another really unique dive site in the area is Alice's Wonderland, off Ginger Island. It is a colorful coral garden with large heads of pillar and star coral with waving purple and green sea fans and soft gorgonians. All five types of butterfly fish can be found including the shy long snout butterfly fish. Large grouper rays, jewfish, African pompano and even reef sharks are also found here on occasion

Day Three

Take the 7:00 ferry out to Anegada for some classic snorkeling and to dive to the Wreck of the Parmatta. The Parmatta, which ran aground on her maiden voyage in 1853, offers opportunities to see butterfly fish, turtles and huge grouper.

While you're on Anegada, don't miss the opportunity to enjoy sea creatures in a different way - the island is famous for it's locally caught lobsters, that they cook in oil drums. Pass the drawn butter!

Head South after lunch to the The Dogs. The Chimney, off Great Dog, was named for two boulders forming a narrow box slot. This slot has a lot of color from sponges and is home to small shrimp, spotted rock lobster, and many anemones. There are ridges and dips with yellow tail damsels, sergeant majors, parrot fish and the occasional scorpion fish.

Wall to Wall off West Dog is a veritable room formed of coral and rock recesses rising from a sandy floor. Marine life is abundant in the form of porkfish, blue striped grunts, big eyes, squirrel fish and angel fish. Octopus, as well as nurse sharks might be found sleeping in a crevice.

Adventure Charters:

If snorkeling deep or shallow, kite surfing, surfing, diving or even parasailing sounds like your idea of a good time, you are in luck. Satisfy your taste for adrenaline in you with these activities....designed to inject a little fun into your vacation

Night Diving:

The adventure, thrill and excitement of night diving can be yours chartering this crewed catamaran. If you think that you know the meaning of 'night life' then you haven't gone scuba diving in the Virgin Islands after dark. The diving scenery at night is a completely different dimension aboard this crewed catamaran ADEIA, Lagoon 500

Kite Surfing:

Whether you're a kite surfer, windsurfing fanatic or simply in a need of a great vacation with a different twist, nothing is more liberating and relaxing than island hopping in the Caribbean on a spacious catamaran. NO sailing experience needed as guided by an experienced crew or sail yourself on a bareboat catamaran with your gear. Our catamarans are large enough to carry all the equipment you need. Consider a 38ft catamaran to 93ft

Kayaking:

The powdery sand beaches along the BVI coastline and exposed waters near inlets and barrier islands are remarkably scenic, quiet and full of wildlife. The many lagoons throughout the islands are an excellent place to paddle your kayak.

Windsurfing:

Our year-round trade winds allow for great windsurfing and kiteboarding experiences. We are also home to the annual Highland Spring HIHO Windsurfing and Sailing Adventure. Competing windsurfers will cover over 150 miles as they race between seven and nine times from one island to another. Finian Maynard is a four-time speed windsurfing world champion (1998 until 2001) and holds the current speed world record for sailing vessels and is currently living in the British Virgin Islands. For more information on where he will be visiting next click here.

Parasailing:

The scenery is superb when you're suspended under a colorful parasail. See the beauty of the entire island from 600 feet above sea level

Swim with Dolphins:

For a unique experience, you can swim with dolphins at Dolphin Discovery, located at Prospect Reef in Tortola. Visitors can get close to these amazing, intelligent creatures, enjoying various activities with the dolphins as well as watching them perform fun and exciting acrobatics

Wakeboarding, knee boarding & skiing:

Our catamarans offer the biggest and most varied adventure programs in the Caribbean. The cool, steady trade winds, countless bays and solid anchorages make it a playground for sailors, water sport enthusiasts, explorers and nature lovers alike. All our crewed yacht catamarans are equipped with a tender that allows fast skiing and kneeboarding.

Family Fun

Are we there yet?

It's time for that tried and true tradition.....the family vacation! While time away is an opportunity for fun, relaxation and togetherness, we know arranging a trip for everyone isn't always easy. That's why catamarans.com has all the tools, deals and information you need to make sure your family and friends are all smiles.

So many beaches, so little time! You want sunny, sandy, warm clear waters?. Look no further! Charter a catamaran bareboat or crewed that will anchor practically on the beach. The shallow draft is perfect to get to those quiet, uninhabited beaches. Experience snorkeling, scuba diving, skiing and more.

Getting Married

It's true what they say: taking a vacation together is really the best way to celebrate.
Sailing onboard on a luxury all inclusive sailing yacht is a great way to enjoy each others company. So go ahead, start planning your wedding and honeymoon while island hopping in the Caribbean

Marriage Rules & Regulations


A marriage license is easy to obtain in the British Virgin Islands and the certificate is valid internationally. A couple is required to be in the BVI for three business days before they can be married. On your day of arrival, apply for a license at the Registrar-General's Office, located on the 2nd floor of the Central Administration Complex in Road Town, Tortola. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Your application will take three business days to be processed.

Requirements of the Registrar-General's Office

Your passports as proof of identity and date of arrival in the BVI.
Proof of marital status (certified original copies of Degree Absolute for divorced spouses or Death Certificate of deceased spouses).
$110.00 (in BVI postage stamps) for a special license for those residing in the BVI for three days or $50.00 (in BVI postage stamps) for those residing in the BVI for 15 days or more.
Two witnesses: (1) for signing the license application and (1) to be present at the marriage ceremony. (Witnesses need not be the same for both exercises; persons in the BVI may be selected as witnesses.
Having applied for the license, go to the Registrar-General's Office to schedule an appointment for the date and time you propose to be married. The Registrar-General will require the following information:
The names of the two parties as they appear on your travel documents
The ages of both parties
The occupations of both parties

Marital Status

The names of the two witnesses to the ceremony
Fees payable to the Registrar-General's Office are $35.00 if the wedding ceremony is to be performed in a church, and $100.00 is it is performed elsewhere. If you wish to be married in a church, wedding announcements must be published on three consecutive Saturdays or Sundays in the church of your choice. You must make arrangement with the minister of the church of your choice. (Publishing of announcements is not necessary if a marriage license is obtained.)

Wedding Planners

The simplest way to get married in the BVI is to have a Wedding Specialist handle the arrangements. From the license and paperwork to the ceremony and honeymoon, your BVI Wedding Specialist will ensure that everything runs smoothly.

To help plan your wedding or honeymoon in the BVI, you can call a BVI Wedding Specialist at a BVI Tourist Board office or email your request to info@bvitourism.com. For further details, please write or call: Registrar-General's Office, P.O. Box 3199, Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands. Tel: 284-494-3492/5650/2783 Fax: 284-494-6664

Note:

All ministers in the BVI are Marriage Officers and can perform civil ceremonies outside church. A Civil Marriage Officer is also available.

Hike and bike

Believe it or not, we can rent you bikes to place aboard your catamaran or many times our catamarans are equipped with them. Each island offers its' own uniqueness many with awesome trails for you and your family to experience. Don't forget to explore the pirate caves on Norman Island! Our charter base is conveniently located next door to vendors who rent all types of equipment like bikes, dive gear, windsurfers and more.

View more about our base and sample itinerary here:

View Itinerary

Jump the Willie T

Located on Norman Island, it's a great spot to dine, enjoy local beverages and dare your family and friends to take the jump!

Foxy's, Jose Van Dyke

All kids, dads, moms and friends enjoy the main drag at Foxy's located on Jost Van Dyke.
Decorate the bar with your underwear ( if you like!)..get your hair braided and beaded. Enjoy
Local beer or local soft drinks like "TING". If you are lucky, you will get to meet Foxy himself...the
Famous local owner and singer! Book a charter during Foxy's wooden boat regatta starting from
West End finishing at Foxy's...an interesting way to spend a couple of days View Calendar of Events

Surfing

During the winter months, expect 4 - 5 ft of clear water tubing waves by Cane Garden Bay. Sometimes even larger waves. It is a world class wave for experienced surfers. A point break, that does break right. Surfers should be familiar with reef (coral, sharp rocks etc) with sand. Normal length of wave is 50 - 150 m and on a good day about 150 to 300 m. But with water at 80 C and no wet suit required, makes it the best surf spot in the BVI's. Also try Apple Bay near the Bomba Shack. Bomba's Beach Shack is at Apple Bay - Capoon's Bay to locals - and is still the place where the surfers hang out in the biggest numbers. Average surf is from 2 to 4 feet, although you can still surf when it's less and, if you're really good, when it reaches up to 10 feet. Aficionados say the beach is at its best when the wind blows south east, but, with both a right and left break, and the sounds of reggae drifting across the surf, this is a place to make sure you go - to see and be seen! Perfect spot for when your surf is done to enjoy a cold red stripe. Many surfboards are available for rent and many crewed yachts have a few surfboards to choose from.